TEN NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS FOR CONTRACTORS-2021

Image
   As I sit down to write my annual list of resolutions for contractors, I am amazed at how much things changed in 2020. Construction was going well and then, in March 2020, COVID-19 hit. At first, we thought it was going to be a disaster for the construction industry. States, cities and towns shut down projects and many applied for PPP loans. Then, something amazing happened. Construction was considered an essential service and everyone was back to work.  That said, the work world changed: companies were donating their PPE to frontline workers, COVID-19 protocols had to be followed and paperwork had to be filed. Everyone was scrambling to figure out how to comply and keep their businesses going. So, you may or may not ask, what was I, as a construction lawyer doing? I spent March and April thinking about the new risks contractors/construction companies were facing and developing contract clauses to protect the industry. I wrote a number of blog posts with clauses to add to your contra

Notification Requirements as of July 6, 2010


When the final invoice for the renovation is delivered or  within 30 days of the completion of the renovation, whichever is  earlier, the renovation firm must provide information pertaining to  compliance with this subpart to the following persons:     (i) The owner of the building; and, if different,     (ii) An adult occupant of the residential dwelling, if the  renovation took place within a residential dwelling, or an adult  representative of the child-occupied facility, if the renovation took  place within a child-occupied facility.     (2) When performing renovations in common areas of multi-unit target housing, renovation firms must post the information required by this subpart or instructions on how interested occupants can obtain a copy of this information. This information must be posted in areas where it is likely to be seen by the occupants of all of the affected units.     (3) The information required to be provided by paragraph (c) of this section may be provided by completing the sample form titled ``Sample Renovation Recordkeeping Checklist'' or a similar form containing the test kit information required by Sec.  745.86(b) (1) (ii) and the training and work practice compliance information required by Sec.  745.86(b) (6).     (d) If dust clearance sampling is performed in lieu of cleaning verification as permitted by Sec.  745.85(c), the renovation firm must  provide, when the final invoice for the renovation is delivered or  within 30 days of the completion of the renovation, whichever is  earlier, a copy of the dust sampling report to:     (1) The owner of the building; and, if different,     (2) An adult occupant of the residential dwelling, if the  renovation took place within a residential dwelling, or an adult  representative of the child-occupied facility, if the renovation took  place within a child-occupied facility.     (3) When performing renovations in common areas of multi-unit target housing, renovation firms must post these dust sampling reports or information on how interested occupants of the housing being renovated can obtain a copy of the report. This information must be posted in areas where they are likely to be seen by the occupants of all of the affected units.

Popular posts from this blog

Who Can File a Mechanic's Lien in Massachusetts?

EPA Starts Assessing Fines for RRP Violations

When You Shouldn’t Mediate Your Construction Dispute